labelunknown:

abrecadavre:

ballbetterthanyou:

leavesandbitches:

So bomb

fav couple ever.

Everything about this, yes

Love her

she-is-king:

Today @ Woodbine Beach, Toronto

Swimsuit by Me (Zubaida Zang)

YeeessSsssSsssssSsss ma’am!

luciomx:

The Coffee Bar

jvpxntrvppin:

electranavy:

► yung navy ◄

麻薬たわごと

how an introvert feels during a social gathering

hazardousfemme:

image

efverdugo:

kingsxoqueens:

Everyday

Plato says, “continual Becoming and never Being” is the sole form of existence? In the first place, a man never is happy, but spends his whole life in striving after something which he thinks will make him so; he seldom attains his goal, and when he does, it is only to be disappointed; he is mostly shipwrecked in the end, and comes into harbor with masts and rigging gone. And then, it is all one whether he has been happy or miserable; for his life was never anything more than a present moment always vanishing; and now it is over. —

Schopenhauer, “Studies In Pessimism”

On The Vanity Of Existence

Pardon’s the word to all. Whatever folly men commit, be their shortcomings or their vices what they may, let us exercise forbearance; remembering that when these faults appear in others, it is our follies and vices that we behold. They are the shortcomings of humanity, to which we belong; whose faults, one and all, we share; yes, even those very faults at which we now wax so indignant, merely because they have not yet appeared in ourselves. They are faults that do not lie on the surface. But they exist down there in the depths of our nature; and should anything call them forth, they will come and show themselves, just as we now see them in others. One man, it is true, may have faults that are absent in his fellow; and it is undeniable that the sum total of bad qualities is in some cases very large; for the difference of individuality between man and man passes all measure. —

Schopenhauer, “Studies In Pessimism”

On The Suffering Of The World

Schopenhauer, “Tricks were meant to be seen only once”

Schopenhauer, Segment from “On The Suffering Of The World”

Studies In Pessimism

He who lives to see two or three generations is like a man who sits some time in the conjurer’s booth at a fair, and witnesses the performance twice or thrice in succession. The tricks were meant to be seen only once; and when they are no longer a novelty and cease to deceive, their effect is gone.

While no man is much to be envied for his lot, there are countless numbers whose fate is to be deplored.

Life is a task to be done. It is a fine thing to say defunctus est; it means that the man has done his task.

If children were brought into the world by an act of pure reason alone, would the human race continue to exist? Would not a man rather have so much sympathy with the coming generation as to spare it the burden of existence? or at any rate not take it upon himself to impose that burden upon it in cold blood.

I shall be told, I suppose, that my philosophy is comfortless — because I speak the truth; and people prefer to be assured that everything the Lord has made is good. Go to the priests, then, and leave philosophers in peace! 

At any rate, do not ask us to accommodate our doctrines to the lessons you have been taught. That is what those rascals of sham philosophers will do for you. Ask them for any doctrine you please, and you will get it. Your University professors are bound to preach optimism; and it is an easy and agreeable task to upset their theories.

I have reminded the reader that every state of welfare, every feeling of satisfaction, is negative in its character; that is to say, it consists in freedom from pain, which is the positive element of existence.